Last edited by Vorr
Thursday, April 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan found in the catalog.

Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan

Dale Whittington

Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan

  • 285 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Development and Research Centre, Faculty of Economic & Social Studies, University of Khartoum in [Khartoum] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Nile River,
  • Ethiopia.
    • Subjects:
    • Water resources development -- Ethiopia.,
    • Nile River -- Regulation.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Dale Whittington.
      SeriesDSRC seminar ;, no. 6O
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTC119.E8 W48 1985
      The Physical Object
      Pagination16 leaves, [4] leaves of plates :
      Number of Pages16
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2707233M
      LC Control Number85981147

      27 Egypt, Ethiopia, and the Nile: The Economics of International Water Law Daniel Abebe* Abstract As part of a Symposium on the book The Economic Foundations of International Law, this Article briefly compares and contrasts two distinct analytical approaches to international law—doctrinal versus economic—in the context of Egypt’s and. Who Owns the Nile? Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia’s History-Changing Dam | Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective 9/29/13 PM The Nile has been essential for civilization in Egypt and Sudan. Without that water, there would have been no food, no people, no Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia’s History-Changing Dam | Origins File Size: KB. The Egypt-Ethiopia Nile Water Crisis: a Cause for Regional Tensions? J Daniel Stoll. Print; Share; While the crises in Syria and Yemen continue to demand the attention of Middle East and world leaders, a series of events in the Nile River Valley bear witness to another important issue that threatens the stability of the river basin and the Horn of Africa.


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Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan by Dale Whittington Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper examines the implications for Egypt and Sudan of the development of Blue Nile water resources by Ethiopia. The long‐term development progamme produced between and by. The most prominent challenge is that Ethiopia is proceeding with the implementation of the Renaissance Dam that represents the greatest threat to Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan book water security, in light of the available information on the dam.

The Renaissance Dam is located on the Blue Nile in western Ethiopia in the Benishangul region, about 40 kilometers [25 miles] from the Sudanese border and kilometers [ Author: Mustafa Saad. "The multidisciplinary volume The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation is published at the right time to take a closer look at the impacts of the GERD on the Nile and its riparians from the perspectives of law, political science, economics Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan book hydrology.

[The book] serves as an initial platform for the urgently needed analysis and Brand: Routledge. Maintaining Egypt’s acquired and historical rights to the Nile waters and preserving its right over the implementation of projects for the development of the river resources in the upstream countries are at the forefront of Egypt’s priorities to meet the requirements of the population growth and economic development plans — in light of its reliance on the Nile to fulfill its water Author: Mustafa Saad.

WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT Volume 3 Number 2 Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan Giorgio Guariso and Dale Whittington This paper examilles Ihe implicatiolls for Egypt alld Sudall of the development of Bille Nile water resollrces by Erhiopia.

The long-term developmenl progamme. Reviews "The multidisciplinary volume The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation is published at the right time to take a closer look at the impacts of the GERD on the Nile and its riparians from the perspectives of law, political science, economics and hydrology.

[The book] serves as an initial platform for the urgently needed. "The multidisciplinary volume The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation is published at the right time to take a closer look at the impacts of the GERD on the Nile and its riparians from the perspectives of law, political science, economics and hydrology.

[The book] serves as an initial platform for the urgently needed analysis and Price: $ The Nile River (NR) is the primary water resource and the life artery for its downstream countries such as Egypt and Sudan.

This chapter focuses on the impacts of constructing the Grand Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan book. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will not only be Africa’s largest dam, but it is also essential for future cooperation and development in the Nile River Basin and East African region.

This book, after setting out basin-level legal and policy successes and failures of managing and sharing Nile waters, articulates the opportunities. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will not only be Africa’s largest dam, but it is also essential for future cooperation and development in the Nile River Basin and East African by: 3.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation - CRC Press Book The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will Implications of Ethiopian water development for Egypt and Sudan book only be Africa’s largest dam, but it is also essential for future cooperation and development in the Nile River Basin and East African region.

The study is published in “Analyzing the economy-wide impacts on Egypt of alternative GERD filling policies,” the seventh chapter of the new book The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation. The book is part of the Earthscan Studies in Water Resource Management series.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will not only be Africa's largest dam, but it is also essential for future cooperation and development in the Nile River Basin and East African region.

This book, after setting out basin-level legal and policy successes and failures of managing and sharing Nile waters, articulates the opportunities and. Egypt has been concerned by the probable negative impact of the dam on the state’s water security, as it may decrease water supply to Egypt.

Ethiopia denies the claims. Sudan, on the other side, supports the 6, MW dam, as it will provide electricity and irrigation, and will regulate floods, according to Reuters.

the benefit of Egypt [whose] established and historic rights were recognized'.' Egypt was assured a minimum of 48 billion cubic metres of water per year, as against 4 billion for the Sudan, and this left approximately 32 billion unallocated. The agreement did not include Ethiopia, and stipulated that 'no works were to be constructed on the.

On April 5, high-level decision-makers from Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan met to discuss key issues related to the filling and long-term operation of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD).

The contentious large-scale hydropower project under construction on the Blue Nile River is expected to be completed soon. At the same time it refuses to acknowledge Cairo’s right to billion cubic metres of water every year, since this emanates from the agreement between Egypt and Sudan to Author: NEVILLE TELLER.

CAIRO – 21 December Egypt did not halt technical studies on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), unlike some rumors circulated by media, Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Mohamed Abdel Aty told African, Arab, and foreign ambassadors in a meeting on Thursday.

Ethiopia and Sudan not responding to Egypt’s calls. Abstract. The Nile River (NR) is the primary water resource and the life artery for its downstream countries such as Egypt and Sudan.

This chapter focuses on the impacts of constructing the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on three main parts of the NR: close to Sudan-Ethiopia border; near Khartoum, Sudan; and the main Nile at the entrance of Lake Nasser, : Mohamed Helmy Elsanabary, Mohamed Helmy Elsanabary, Abdelkader T.

Ahmed. Egypt’s share of Nile water has until now been regulated by a agreement with Sudan, under which Egypt gets bn cubic meters a year and Sudan bn.

(The annual flow averages 84bn cubic meters, 10bn of which evaporate from Lake Nasser, created by the construction of the Aswan Dam, which came into operation in ). Ahram Online publishes a translated version of the "Declaration of Principles" signed by Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia in a step to put an end to a four-year dispute over Nile water sharing arrangements among Nile Basin countries.

Ten principles are outlined in the document signed by the three countries. Introduction Valuing the increasing need of File Size: KB. Egypt sees Ethiopian dam as risk to water supply spot in the lowest rungs of the world's human development index.

But for Egypt, the consequences could be dire: a. The Ethiopian government and communities, by using different management approaches and resources, are trying to boost water, energy and food production, strengthen conservation efforts and mitigate potential repercussions of water resources development.

These initiatives and programs have not been comprehensively examined.3/5(1). The 14 chapter book deals with water resources management in a comprehensive manner encompassing all issues that relate to development to pollution and impact.

The presentation style of the book goes from general to specific issues within the Ethiopian context. Cited by: 2.

Get this from a library. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin: implications for transboundary water cooperation. [Zeray Yihdego; Alistair Rieu-Clarke; Ana Elisa Cascão;] -- "The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) will not only be Africa's largest dam, but it is also essential for future cooperation and development in the Nile River Basin and East African region.

It is a grand claim, but one that helps explain Egypt's indignation at the ongoing construction of a blockage on the Nile, thousands of miles upstream: the Author: Patrick Kingsley.

Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia experts meet Thursday to discuss Nile dam studies Ahram Online, Wednesday 13 Sep A close-up shot of he Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam in close snapshots, July Water Resources Management in Ethiopia: Implications for the Nile by: Helmut Kloos and Worku Legesse (With 17 contributors)Cambria Press: Amherst: New York; Hard Cover, pages (with 14 chapters and Index)Cited by: 2.

In addition, Egypt had the right to veto upriver water projects. A later treaty, the so-called Nile Waters Agreement between Egypt and Sudan, allocated bcm/y to Egypt and bcm/y to Sudan—the total allocation was nearly 90% of the estimated average annual Nile River flow (84 bcm/y, mostly from the Blue Nile).

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have reached an agreement in their ongoing dispute over the construction of the Renaissance Dam on the River Nile. Progress was made in. T he Nile flows for 6, kilometres through ten countries in north-eastern Africa – Rwanda, Burundi, Zaïre/Congo, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Sudan, and Egypt – before reaching the Mediterranean, and is the longest international river system in the world – see Map 1.

Its two main tributaries converge at Khartoum: the White Nile, which originates from Burundi and Cited by:   Africa's largest hydropower project, a new 6,megawatt dam on the Blue Nile, has sparked a row between Egypt and Ethiopia.

But it could increase the overall water flow in the Nile. Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan discussed on Tuesday the technical proposal to study the effects of the under-construction Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, which has troubled Egypt.

After a meeting in Sudanese capital Khartoum, the three countries, each represented by a technical committee, arrived at a joint memo of their observations on the study proposal handed to them [ ].

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and the Nile Basin book. Implications for Transboundary Water Cooperation. By analysing the cooperation between Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan on the Blue Nile, this paper seeks to Author: Zeray Yihdego, Alistair Rieu-Clarke.

Nile water crisis places Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia on the brink of war a meeting held to the exclusion of Sudan between then Ethiopian President, Meles Zenawi, and Egyptian Prime Minister.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: Egypt and Sudan move from denial to acceptance on Daily Maverick Photo: A fisherman travels on a boat with his family during low water levels on the river Nile.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

This book covers the entire Nile Basin and reflects the latest findings. It provides unique and cutting-edge insights into the region’s agriculture, water resources, governance, poverty, productivity, upstream-downstream linkages, innovations, future plans and their implications.

By Dale Whittington | (The Conversation) | - - The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, or GERD, under construction on the Blue Nile near the Ethiopian-Sudanese border, is now approximately 50% complete. Initial filling will start this year and will begin in earnest in The idea of a dam on the Nile in Ethiopia – and the threat this would pose for Egypt – has been on the minds of the.

There was camaraderie in Khartoum as the leaders of Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia celebrated a deal designed to ease fears that a controversial new dam could spark a regional conflict. Giorgio Guariso and Pdf Whittington (), ‘Implications of Ethiopian Water Development for Egypt and Sudan’ Nils-Henrik M.

von der Fehr and Lise Sandsbråten (), ‘Water on Fire: Gains from Electricity Trade’ Soil erosion and its internalization within a download pdf trade institution The Nile River is known to have more than 13 bcm of water per year lost annually to evaporation at the High Aswan Dam in Egypt and million cubic meters of topsoil erosion in Ethiopia, soil eroded in Ethiopia ends up in Sudan and Egypt, and is considered a unidirectional by: Governing the Nile River Basin Kimenyi, Mwangi, Mbaku, John ebook of Ethiopian Water Development for Egypt and Sudan.” International Journal of Water Resources Development3, no.

2: – Hall, C. G. The Origin and Development of Water Rights in South Africa. OxfordCited by: 6.